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be defended here in russia, but i am limited by my inability to speak russian and so on that it's an isolating and frustrating thing. i really hope that russia, the united states and many other countries will work to push back against this constantly increasing surveillance, this constant erosion and abrasion of
history, throughout time. >> what are you doing in russia? >> all right. so this is a really fair concern. i personally am surprised that i ended up here. the reality is i never intended to end up in russia. i had a flight from cuba to latin america. the united states revoked my passport to trap me in the moscow airport. when people ask why are you in russia, i say please ask the state department. >> the u.s. state department says snowden's passport was
in ways that i would consider deeply unfair. the recent bloggers' registration law in russia, i can't think of any basis for a law like that. not just in russia, but any country. the government shouldn't regulate the operations of a free press whether it is nbc or some blogger in their living room. there is so much that needs to be defended here in russia, but i am limited by my inability to speak russian and so on that it's an isolating and frustrating thing.
>> mr. secretary, i suspect him another topic. russia plans to turn to china for money or ask for investments to compensate with what they're losing with sanctions in the u.s. and eu. are you willing to pressure and urge your chinese counterparts not to go along? >> we talk about a wide range of topics when we meet. i will bring topics central to the u.s. agenda and they will raise topics of concern with them. we have been making the case consistently wherever we go that it is unacceptable for russia to violate ukraine's sovereignty. when we take action and other countries in the world take action, it's important for them not to be backfilled. >> and we would not be happy. >> it's an argument i make wherever i go. >> you will make it in beijing. >> we will talk about a whole range of topics. >> let's talk about putin and ukraine. why not impose tougher sectorial sanctions? would they apply to a wide swath of financial and energy industries or be more targeted specifically? >> the steps we have taken with regard to russia have been very carefully determined and quite effective.
." hello. i am ray suarez. after the brack-up of the soviet uni union, the largest republic, russia was in freefall, influence in decline, life expectancy dropping, national self-evide -- self-esteem takin beating. china surged and became an engine of the world economy. china sucked in resources from every corner of the earth and sent out ships piled high with finished consumer goods. in big tower turns, the u.s. still had an open field to run in during the 1990s. nato expanded east into the old warsaw packet. parts of the empire joined the union. china became washington's banker buying a prod i knigious amount american debt but was not in a world power like the world meant it in the days of the cold war. now, it's the u.s. having trouble working its will in the world, china making new friends and buying new friends in africa and latin america and russia undergirding its economic by selling natural resources for top dollar. >> it took 10 years to cut a deal, but china and russia, two world powers and formerly bitter rivals came together when their energy and political interests merg
took nothing to russia, so i could give them mothing. >> you say you're not carrying around any of the materials. you are handing them off. if i gave you a laptop, could you access the documents? >> no, no. >> no, you couldn't remotely, electronically access material? >> no. >> it's gone from your control? >> right. i don't have any control --
it was by destroying material i was holding before i transited through russia.
the government of viktor yanukovych to a creeping russia, to the eruption of protests across eastern ukraine, to what we have today, a situation inching closer to all-out fighting to russian alined irregular forces and ukranian military forces. as uptions and storming the buildings spread, the kiev government threatened retaliation and publicly acknowledged it lost before the fighting began. when the ukrainian government fought back, russia, a foreign country, warned ukraine about trying to reoccupy its open government buildings on its own soil. the tempo of fighting is increasing and people continue to die. >> reporter: pro-russian forces brought down two military helicopters in slovyansk - one using a sophisticated surface-to-air missile. this man is said to be a survivor. two other helicopter crew members were killed, along with a pro-russian militiaman. it was the first sign of the kiev government's counteroffensive to reclaim the eastern part of the country. >>. >> operations are ongoing, casualties mounting as an offensive against the pro-russian insurgency unfolds. by early evening yo
in 1994 and the subsequent one in 1997 it was a necessary decision. >> how was it seen in russia at the time? how would you answer that question? i will answer it today the way they answered it in that time. one of my russian compatriots -- 9.celebrated v-day on may what happened after that? is part of the answer to your question. that ispened after stalin remained in power in the andem of which ignited participated in aggression 1993 -- against poland, that system in russia in the soviet union remains. that was the course of the cold war instead of the united in proper terms of not in technical terms of the word. then what happens today, the main problem is that russia has this.t bothered with stalin is referred to the approved or endorsed textbooks for our children. able -- as an manager. can you believe it happened in germany with hitler? an ableonsidered manager. that is basically what happened. that is basically the root of the problem today with the theine that is part of russian establishment. do you know what happened? 1994, russian elite, the ruling class, those who bene
from chuck hagel talking about the nato alliance as tension heightens between russia and ukraine. russia's military move quote shatter the myth that the end of the cold war meant an end to insecurity at least in europe. speaking in washington he says the european nato members need bolster their expense effort because they will test the 28-nation lead alliance. we expect remarks to get underway in just a moment here at the wilson center. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> morning. >> good morning. >> morning, everyone and welcome to the wilson center. i am jane harmon the president and ceo. i am delighted to introduce our first event this morning. let me welcome the cochair and former chair and ambassadors from countries and our speakers for the next panel which is going to be introduced later. i have to recognize the former german ambassador who is a scholar at the wilson center. in 1997, my daughter hillary then a princeton senior majoring in politics picked nato as her thesis topic. she called her mom, me i
>> welcome back to the newsroom. you are watching "france 24.a" a deal between russia and beijing. they call it the biggest contract with the former ussr, and militants strike again as workers are searching through bombs one day after twin killed one hundred 18 people, and floodwaters recede in the balkans, revealing devastation. swiss -- swift delivery of aid. we began with the signing of a major energy deal. china and russia have reached an agreement over gas supply. the $400 billion agreement comes after a decade in the making. for china, the world's top energy user, it secures a fast source of cleaner fuel, while for russia, it opens up a wider market as it is losing customers in europe over the crisis in ukraine. the details. >> the detail is signed after 10 years of negotiations. a 400 and china inked billion dollar agreement. starting in 2018, gazprom will gasrise -- supply natural every year, one quarter of what china consumes. this will last 30 years. negotiations were delayed due to a disagreement over prices. they believe that international circumstances may have pushed
with human beings. the bottom line is this is a man who has betrayed his country, who is sitting in russia, an authoritarian country where he has taken refuge. you know, he should man up and come back to the united states. if he has a complaint about what's the matter with american surveillance, come back here and stand in our system of justice and make his case. but instead he's just sitting there taking pot shots at his country, violating his oath that he took when he took on the job he took and betraying, i think, you know, fundamental agreements that he entered into when he became an employee. and the fact is he has damaged his country very significantly in many, many ways.
journalist and laura poitras, a documentary filmmaker both of whom traveled to russia for our interview. in his recently published book "no place to hide" greenwald describes that moment he first met snowden in hong kong. >> what did you make of him? >> the initial impression was one of extreme confusion. because i was expecting to meet somebody in his 60s or 70s, very senior. i knew almost nothing about him prior to our arrival in hong kong. >> it was a really intimidating moment. you know, it was the most real point of no return because the minute you start talking to a journalist as an intelligence officer, on camera, there's really no going back from that. that's where it all comes together.
. >> if this man is a patriot, he should stay in the united states and make his case. patriots don't go to russia. they don't seek asylum in cuba and venezuela. they fight their cause here. there are many a patriot. you can go back to the pentagon papers with dan ellsberg and others who stood and went to the court system of america and made their case. edward snowden is a coward, he is a traitor and he has betrayed his country and if he wants to come home tomorrow to face the music, he can do so. >> well, today the famed pentagon papers whistleblower dan ellsberg is sounding off about kerry's comments.
and then the lady behind him. >> hi, i'm ira >> gorbachev did raise the question shouldn't russia join nato also, and james baker pooh-poohed him, and anytiming having made a mistake, james baker later regreated that and -- regretted that and said he should have engaged gorbachev on that question. one of the first acts of the yeltsin government in december 1991 was to raise the question of nato membership, the foreign ministry later said it was a mistranslation, but officials assured me that, in fact, it was a true translation, they just had to withdraw it because it became such a political embarrassment for yeltsin and if or you personally -- and for you personally. i am wondering how much damage has been done by our lack of engagement with russia on the question of a serious integration with russia and its interests with nato. >> first of all, i cannot agree more on your statement, thank you so much. [laughter] and secondly, i agree with the assumption of your question, yes. that's the point, and that's where i technically agree, and i see the point of putin when he says that we had kind of, w
diplomatic encounter which is the russia slr ukraine meeting in geneva and crucial 19 days from now until the may 25th presidential elections in ukraine. for a quick reminder about the commitments made in geneva. at its core, it was kind of a grand bargain that offered amnesty and deep and broad decentralization of power to ukraine's regions through national dialogue and constitutional reform if and as pro-russian separatists ended their violence and left sized buildings and gave up weapons, all of it to be guaranteed and overseen. as you know, the ukrainian government began implementing its part of geneva before the ink was barely dry on the text. it introduced a broad amnesty bill and authorities in kiev dismantling barricades and opening streets on april 14th and on the 29th the constitutional reform commission held public conferences to which all of the regions were invited by decentralization and reform. ukrainian security forces even instituted an easter pause in clearing operations and sent senior officials out to the east to try to talk to separatists and get them to pursue aims p
. considering meet to -- to consider widening sanctions against russia. this is as eastern ukraine votes to self-rule. >> and xi says china needs to adapt to a pace of slower expansion. welcome to "the pulse," live from bloomberg european headquarters in london. i am mark barton. >> and i am caroline hyde. also coming up, the father of wearable computing joins us on "the pulse." he has been wearing a cyborg eye for 30 years. >> rupert murdoch is reviving a plan to build a european paid tv empire by combining sky dortch land and sky italian. y georgia land -- deut scheland and sky italia. what is murdoch's land here. >> broken by my colleague sitting right next to you, it is to take 20th century fox, one of the two companies that murdoch now has, and to have it, through his control of b-sky-b, take full ownership of sky d eutscheland and sky italia. it has a 100% stake, fox foxrols this aspect of it, has that stake. you combine them together and what you would really bring is a pan-european company that can negotiate on sports, advertising, and it can combine all of those subscribers. deutee grow
and ease tensions with russia which has been accused of backing the separatist movement there. >> russian president vladimir putin expressed the support saturday saying he would respect any choice made by the ukrainian people. joining me now from washington is victoria nuland. >> she is the assistant secretary of state for european and eurasian affairs, welcome. >> thank you, david for having me. >> so, tell me, there is this election in ukraine has important, for ukrainians but what about u.s.-russian repopulations which has been in a ditch for months now. >> you are right, david it was a spectacular day for the people of ukraine who went out in force to choose a new president and to say to their government and to the world that they want a future that is unified, that is democratic, that is process sphrows and that is rooted in europe. >> in terms of the u.s.-russia relationship, i think time will tell. the president of russia says he will respect the results and work with the elected president so if that is in fact the case and the things begin to deescalate in ukraine it would be a go
for them but if they have to do this for the first quarter, what does it mean for russia going forward? >> we have figures from carlsberg. the biggest russian brewer. we will have more of that shortly. david is in headquarters in berlin. of newse a lot coming out of siemens. you have first-quarter earnings and more importantly you have this strategic review, an entire level of bureaucracy taken out of siemens. four sectors becoming nine units. the health-care care sector, speculations that will be separated just like we saw within finian. you have the turbine business from rolls-royce. a lot going on. i will be back with my interview with the ceo of little bit later. >> we will get back to that shortly. in paris, you are watching ahlstrom have a bidding war getting more politically -- more political. conference is just about to start behind me the focus will be on whether i'll strom -- i'll strum -- al will put up for the 70 billion on the energy unit. will this -- the share holders vote on the energy units in the fourth quarter. thisl bring you this with with figures from the french f
against russia. lobby tobedfellows make drones legal in the u.s.. tv executives raise for ad dollars in her newest primetime lineups. to our viewers in the united states and those of you joining us from around the world, welcome. we have full coverage of the stocks and stories making headlines today. phil mattingly looks at cashing at a the financial crisis theater near you. and netails on the fcc neutrality. we begin with new developments in the crisis in ukraine. yesterday's were vote in eastern ukraine? >> that's a good question and it's when the unit b -- the european union and united states are questioning big time. we saw the self-declared peoples republic both claiming they had separatism,port for independence and eventual annexation by russia. but in fact this is a lot of disparity to some credible polls we saw over the last couple of weeks, including the pew center who did a poll showing in western ukraine, more than 90% of the people supported a unified ukraine while even in eastern ukraine, where largely russia is -- russian is spoken, you have 70% support. our reporters o
we can go into today -- ukraine has opened questions about u.s.-russia policies dating back to the end of the cold war, specifically questions about whether the clinton published -- president bush 43 and obama administration fundamentally mishandled russia. they failed to properly acknowledge it interests and humiliated in ways that haunt us today or today try too hard to accommodate a russia that acts in ways contrary to international stability? how does this change the way we think about the salience of nuclear weapons? second, russia's coercive and successful use of diplomacy, operational operations -- informational operations has raised security about other states in russia's periphery, including nato allies belarus, moldova, poland, and others. today, the united states has responded with small-scale rotations of its forces in its -- and its nato allies have done likewise. diplomatic messaging has occurred, sanctions have been taken, but they have had very little impact on russia's decision-making. moreover, it has raised questions about nato's long-term ability to stand
the margin leaders to stop fomenting unrest in the region. the diplomat said russia would potentially face further sanctions if it interferes with ukraine's national elections scheduled for may twenty fifth japanese prime minister shinzo ave has again urged russia to respect the results of the upcoming presidential elections in ukraine. speaking after a meeting at me to take orders to rustle up they said his country would not tolerate the use of force in ukraine nato secretary general anders phone ross mitcham said the alliance was ready to take further steps if one of its members was to be trapped in the european union japan and the united states have placed a piece that made him an asset freeze that spawned dozens of individual song close to russia president what he referred to him but have held back on wider trade sanctions. it's like an escalation of the crisis in ukraine both japan and the united states have emphasized the importance of ukraine carrying out free elections by march twenty fifth to give people the democratic choice of who should succeed pro russian president to kiama co
and cooperation in europe and its proposed roadmap to ease tensions between russia and ukraine which reeks like ukrainian idea not just torture law yes you reiterated that the kremlin has so far refused to fulfill the promises made in geneva on april seventeen to de escalate tensions by withdrawing russian special services unit fomenting unrest in the mouth nato secretary general anders for the region has again called on russia to stop supporting the protest in ukraine and scaled back troops from ukraine porter writes recent aggression in escalating the crisis from the start and should start living up to its international commitment russian president what you're putting on a seven announced it yet pull back troops from the ukrainian border. however nato and us pentagon hours later to attend the thousands of russian troops remain on euclid corridor us city leaders have also had the kremlin to stop supporting armed insurgents in eastern and southern ukraine a charge kremlin leaders did not despite evidence to the contrary provided by different state security service a kremlin backed rebellion in
challenge to de-escalate conflict and avoid miscalculation over the events in ukraine and russia. nato expansion is again being scrutinized. today's topic into the fold or out in the cold could not be more timely or fit better with what the wilson center does well our kennan institute headed by matt who is was sitting in the corner right here was founded by the kennan family and boasts over 1400 scholar alumni, 100 of which are currently on the ground in ukraine and our global europe program headed by christian osterman are here has hundreds of scholar alumni bordering the conflict zone. we have assembled the program today including former officials from russia and poland who were key roles in 1994. wolfgang is injured who is of policy planning at the german foreign office the deputy assistant secretary of nato and the wilson center global fellow cheryl cross. news our star margaret warner right over there will moderate but here to keynote kickoff our conversation is secretary of defense chuck hagel who was elected to the senate in 1997 and voted for nato expansion. i checked. after hi
not indicate any plans for russia to annex eastern ukraine like it annexed crimea following a similar referendum in march. >> we respect the will of the residence of the donetsk and luhansk region. dialogue between representatives of kiev, donetsk and luhansk. >> to talk more about ukraine was and is referendum will mean, we're joined by stpehen cohen from new york university and princeton university. his most recent book is, "soviet fates and lost alternatives: from stalinism to the new cold war." he recently cowrote an article for the nation with katrina vanden heuvel headlined, "cold war against russia -- without debate." so the significance of this election? >> the referendum yesterday? to make relations between moscow and the united states and europe worse, but it shouldn't. a bunch of people decided to have a referendum, which is no more or less legal than the government in kiev, which came to power from the street. what is interesting about it is that it went off with animal violence, and it tells you a lot of people down there -- minimal violence, and it tells you that a lot o
that they wanted the future that is democratic, unified, rooted in europe. in terms of the u.s.-russia relations ship, i think time will tell. the president of russia said that you will risk that the result and work with whoever elected. it will be good for russian relations with the rest of the world. time will tell. >> he snatched away crimea. that seems not even in question anymore and there seems to some extent to be a retreat. his popularity has shot up through the roof. he has one on has terms, has he not? >> i don't think it's wise for anyone to get in the head of president putin the given what has happened just in the last four months. let me take issue with one thing you said there with regards to crimea. neither united states nor most of the civilized world has recognized what russia did in crimea. we still respect the territorial integrity. that will continue. with regard to where it goes from here, as i said, i think we just don't know yet. it will depend very much on whether he decides to reach out to president-elect poroshenko and whether he's interested in the escalating. we have
they are doing in reaction to what is going on in the ukraine and russia. are they delaying investment? are they delaying plans for employment? we are going to speak to the president of ifo later in the program and these are the sorts of questions i want to hear the answers from him about. the other thing that has been going on in the german economy, that i think is quite interesting, it looks like we are seeing the first signs of a rebalancing going on. we got the pmi yesterday. still above 50, but the interesting thing was going on with the services. they were really very strong. is that a rebalancing of the german economy, something that mf, the unitedi states has been asking for? it will take longer before we find out the answer to that, what we could be witnessing the beginning of a trend. >> david tweed, our european editor for us, in berlin. >> the national economic forum in st. petersburg, president putin will address business leaders later today. ryan chilcote is there as well. to those -- what did those who have shown up look to hear from the president later? >> i think they
such a strong partner on this issue. you have spoken out forcefully and against russia's illegal actions in ukraine and you have been a leader in the european union as well as an indispensable partner in the g7. your presence here today is a reminder that our nation stand united. we are united in our coordinateon on sanctions. we are united on our unwavering article five commitment to the security of our nato allies including german aircraft joining nato patrols over the baltics. we are united in our support for ukraine including the very program approved this week to help them stabilize and reform its economy. as ukrainian forces move to restore order in eastern ukraine, it is obvious to the world that these russian groups are not peaceful protesters. they are heavily armed militants who are receiving significant support from russia. the ukrainian government has the right and responsibility to uphold law and order within its territory and russia needs to use its influence over these paramilitary groups of they disarm and stop evoking violence. let me say that we are also united in our o
of sanctions by the u.s. and european union stopped short of hitting russia's oil and gas industry. trade between the two countries amounted to $100 billion last year. >> we work very closely with russia. we are to some extent even dependant on russia gas, so for that reason we are hesitant to put more pressure on russia. >> reporter: foreign policy analyst mark fisher says the white house sees merkel as a possible bridge. >> she is the link of communication with putin right now. in that respect, being here in washington the day after she just talked to putin, it's very important for symbolic and political reasons. we're not so hot blooded so chancellor merkel is someone on the german scene and europe yoon political scene who likes to lead by consensus. >> reporter: that cool demeanor may keep the german chancellor from hitting president obama with a scathing public critique of the nsa monitoring her private calls. >> she will say very clearly that she is disappointed, but she will do that behind closed doors. she will talk very openly, i think to president obama about this issue, but she
whether it's the failed reset with russia or the failure in benghazi that actually cost lives. >> what grade you to give her as a secretary of state? >> i don't think she has a passing grade. >> you think she has an "f"? >> if you look at the diplomacy pursued during her time in the state department, it's failed everywhere. if she's going to run on her record of secretary of state, she's going to have to answer for its failure. >> reporter: this week, the white house issued a report on the dangers of climate change. >> climate change is affecting americans, all across the country. >> miami, tampa, most affected by climate change. so putting aside your disagreement with what to do about it, do you agree on the science on this? how big a threat is climate change? >> i don't agree with the notion that some are putting out there including scientists, that somehow, there are actions that we can take today that would have an impact. our climate is always changing. they've chosen to take a handful of decades of research and say it is now evidence of a longer term trend that is direct
-- russia and china signed a landmark energy deal. could it be a geopolitical game changer? >> with nigeria still reeling from yesterday's attacks, there are reports of more killings by militants. >> and we will take a look at some of the favorites at the cannes film festival. >> russia and china have signed an energy deal that promises to be a global game changer. a 30-year oil and gas contract that would pump hundreds of billions into kremlin coffers. >> it's far more than simply a trade pact. >> it was more than a decade in the making, and it is a political triumph for president vladimir putin, who was courting partners in asia as the west seeks to isolate him over his ukraine policy. >> russia's president vladimir putin was determined not to end his visit to china without a big deal. a few strokes of a pen by the two countries signal successful conclusion. the agreement with china's national petroleum organization will run over 30 years. the russian president hailed the agreement. >> this is the biggest contract in the history of the gas industry in the former ussr and the russian feder
written no less than 19 bucks on europe, russia, and the trans-atlantic relationship. and i would just give you the title of his most recent book his most recent one is conflict zones, the western balkans compared. in our next speaker will be ariel cohen. he is the senior research fellow in russian and eurasian studies and international elegy energy policy and national defense policy here at the heritage foundation. ariel cohen has served as a consultant to the executive branch and private vector with russia and central europe and central asia. finally speaking today and authentic ukrainian perspective, we are very lucky to have her as a visiting fellow hear the heritage foundation. she is a core fellow at the center for international trade and economics. she was previously at the institute of economic research and policy at the national university of tf. without further ado, we thank you. please stand if you feel more comfortable. >> i feel comfortable. i will go handstand. why not. >> okay, thank you so much for inviting me. it's always good to be here. it has been a few years since
in china gin jiang region. >>> when you look at what has happened in russia, if you don't have the guts to invest here, you better stay at home. you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> a warm welcome today, this is "worldwide exchange." we'll be in ukraine and st. petersburg fairly shortly. the health of the ecb. the flash composite pmi coming in at 53.9, exactly as expected according to the reuters poll. it was 54 in april. the composite output price index, 58.7. flash pmi 52.5. that's a dip down from april. it was 53.2 in the poll. the services pmi 53.5. it's a tick higher from the 53 in the reuters poll. it's weaker than we might have expected. but that all means that the composite number has come out on the same. it's worth pointing out this morning that the french composite pmi flash was estimated at 49 3. in the first quarter we saw france was flat gdp growth. the german composite pmi number estimated at 56.1. and that was the manufacturing component came in weaker. let's get some breakdown with this with the man who works for th
on alert. >> russia behavior, will go beyond crimea, will go beyond ukraine. >> nato's role, we'll talk to the head of the alliance and ask what it will take to stop the crisis. and how swapping blood of the young with the old may reverse the aging crisis. and cinco de mayo the true story behind the unusual holiday. ♪ >>> we begin in nigeria where the anguish has intensified for the families of 276 girls kidnaps three weeks ago. richelle carey is here with more. >> numerous reports have surfaced saying the girls were married off to their captors for $12 apiece. boko haram is saying the girls are their slaves and will be sold. >> reporter: yanked there their beds in the dead of eight. about 300 young women ages 16 to 18 were told they would be taken somewhere safe by men dressed in police uniforms. but the men were actually members of boko haram. we know little about the girls. only some of their names have been released. many of the names are bib lickly inspires. about two thirds are reportedly christian, and have been forced to convert to islam. famili families and supporters have be
cnbc exclusively if elected he will engage with russia but won't focus on crimea or closer ties to europe. >>> the country's military bans 155 people from leaving the country. marking the 19thth coup in just 82 years. >>> and spain's credit rating is raised to bbb. structural reforms are paying off for the country. >> the upgrade to the growth forecast for the coming years that we see are a reflection of some of the fruits being harvested of the structural reforms, labor markets reform that has been enacted. >>> you're watching "worldwide exchange," bringing you business news from around the globe. >>> warm welcome to today's edition of "worldwide exchange." plenty to get through. we start off with perhaps europe's most important economic indicator. it's come in 10.4 in may, below the consensus number which was 110.9. current conditions index, 114.8. the consensus forecast was 114.5. the german expectations index, 106.2 in may. the consensus forecast, 106.6. the april number was 111.2. we have dipped down from that. a lull they're talking about seeing in the german economy in ma
may 25. citizens will vote for the successor to a place be ousted president that fled to russia back in february. topic expected to be discussed include involvement in ukraine, security concerns during the election and policy implications with the u.s.. let's go to the coverage under way right now on c-span2. >>> [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. welcome to the heritage foundation and the louis lehrman auditorium and welcomed to those of us joining on the heritage.org website. we would ask everyone to be so kind to check cell phones as we check that they have been turned off and i guess our panelists will address the fact that we can thank president putin for discussing ukraine as the lead into the panel. the post this morning is helle dale for public diplomacy for ththe sarah allison center for falling national security policy. she focuses on the government institutions and programs for strategic outreach to the public countries as well as more traditional diplomacy. she's also a fellow at the hoover i
): russia! russia! >> narrator: watching as the former soviet country veers to the brink of civil war. it's provoked one of the biggest confrontations between russia and the united states since the cold war. >> jones: it was late february when i came to the capital, kiev, to independence square, where protesters were demanding the ouster of president viktor yanukovych. widely criticized as a corrupt leader, he had rejected a trade deal with the european union in favor of one with his close ally, russian president vladimir putin. one of the first people i met was dmytro holubnychy. the 16-year-old student told me what he'd experienced a few days before in the square still haunted him. >> (translated): i can't sleep. whenever i try to sleep, smoke appears before my eyes and the image of that man being killed. >> jones: dmytro told me how he'd come to the square to join the protestors. early on his first morning, fighting broke out with riot police. (police shouting commands) dmytro's father filmed what happened to him and his son. >> i woke up at 6:00, and they told me we were under attack
to keep in mind is traditionally virtually all of russia's gas supply went through ukraine hence the problem we are having. but that has been diversified because of the lack of the truck the russian's have had in the whole post-cold war era due to non-payment and what the russians contrued as sacred gas. this has been the problem that the russian's haven't been able to control the supplies flowing through ukraine. as a lack of that control they have built pipelines of which the first you see here and better here. where we have two pipelines now up and running. but despite the fact that we have probably around 5 and a half billion cubic feet of deliverability they have not and are not running at that rate. and that is principally due to complex regulation in the eu which means there has been a constraint on the amount of pipeline capacity that gas probe has been allowed to use. that might have been resolved but due to the ukrainian situation and the brussels situation it hasn't been resolved. that is a simple problem compared to this one. which is the new p
spoken out forcefully and against russia's illegal actions in ukraine and you have been a leader in the european union as well as an indispensable partner in the g7. your presence here today is a reminder that our nations stand united. we are united in our determination on coordinated sanctions. we are united on our unwavering article five commitment to the security of our nato allies including german aircraft joining nato patrols over the baltics. we are united in our support for ukraine including the very important imf program approved this week to help them stabilize and reform its economy. as ukrainian forces move to restore order in eastern ukraine, it is obvious to the world that these russian groups are not peaceful protesters. they are heavily armed militants who are receiving significant support from russia. the ukrainian government has the right and responsibility to uphold law and order within its territory and russia needs to use its influence over these paramilitary groups of they disarm and stop. evoking provoking violence. let me say that we are also united in our
on monday in jail to the referendum. and disliked and dismal sanctions on russia has sent ukrainians you can lead to his stupidity continues. moscow by the way blowing hot and cold for mr said the law frost warning is french counterpart it would be quote senseless up for ukraine to hold in the twenty fifth presidential action omelette skip all that government forces from the east and starts a dialogue on a new constitution. here in france v e day commemorated on the eighth. now the ninth of may as it is the east of europe president paul scored on taking the opportunity to state that russia's president is still very much invited to next month's commemorations of the seventieth anniversary of d day the white house putting to rest any hope of any one on one meeting between barack obama and biden are put in during those commemorations. indeed a chance for or tongs in the current context to hammer home the need for united europe. commemorations began the atrocities in general do cool stuff cheap. and president assad on to proceedings in the presence of the former president's grandson the vehicle
from europe, from russia, or otherit through mechanisms. so it is very important. as far as the efficiency rates, ma'am, there, you crane is very inefficient. and the department of energy together with us is working on ukraines to work with to see what we can do to increase efficiency rates. as many haves addressed the subsidy issue where gas is so cheap that don't want to conserve, but also to put in place the kind of mechanisms and will allow for more conservation, so they can do far more with less or with same amount. that's a program that we've done in other countries, d.o.e. and department of state work together on these issues and i think we have a number much proposals that could work rewell for ukraine. >> mr. smith, can we talk about ferk and the process there is i understand is under cumbersome and takes longer how the that interrelate with process that you have ongoing? >> thank you. to get too far into the details of the ferk process, i would not be able to characterize it appropriately, but in general the ferk has an important theof managing environmental pro
and demanding great couple to meet the teacher. so heads to washington to discuss the sanctions on russia ukraine and germany. this is true of harnessing. wait a second in kimonos has lost its not considered an opponent and notes upon the cause of the swelling the ukrainian fine. the one scene. bonnie's life the county. and i was some breaking news on the sea at least two ukrainian troops and one self defense funny to have been killed to kiev relaunch the miniature castle on the east tennessee to have fun be honest which is held my anti government protest as the cca in the donetsk region has a population of just about a hundred thousand. and it's now been painted with people unable to monterey scary. the us. you can see the times of desperate non locals have been trying to prevent it brings me to call a black criminal unseen by simply standing in the way the truth didn't seem all that can stand up for a show which kicks off at the leak came from by the ground and ground and that was the helicopters were sent to read these kinds of that plan b i t was gunned down by the self defense forces
just after russia warned ukraine and not to initiate military out rations, saying that would be a loss mistake. the ukraine president elect pushing to clear that area of rebels. >> the follow-up question is, how is russia reacting to the crackdown on those rebels? >> the russians have reiterated their demand that the youth lenience cease their operations in the east of the country. in the last 24 hours, we have seen several pro-russian fighters move into the east of the country. many of the men describing themselves as volunteers. the ukraine accused the russian government of funding and allowing these to come into the ukraine. they are studying the situation and are definitely not pleased and warned the ukraine not to go forward with this. we will have to keep an eye on that very carefully. >> thank you. let's look at u.s. reaction to the victory. bloomberg news foreign policy reporter joins us now in washington. .ell us more how will they deal with him? off to norself-made who grew up under soviet ukraine and eventually made his $1 billion in chocolate. he is known as the chocolate k
stiffer sanctions, sanctions on the various sectors of russia's economy, the mining sector and believes that would have a bigger bite than sanctions implemented so far which largely target individuals. russia has been hesitant to move forward with stiffer sanctions because they are far more dependent on russia for things like oil than the united states is. so that is where the divide comes in. president obama has said he doesn't want to move forward without his european allies because he wants to present a united front to russia. the u.s. calculation being that that is far stronger than if the u.s. were to move forward unilaterally with those sectoral sanctions but germany is the linchpin here. so president obama will be trying to do some arm twisting. as you say, another issue that might come up the nsa, the two leaders could discuss the fact that german chancellor merkel was quite upset by the revelations that her cell phone had been happened. but the issue of ukraine will overshadow all of the other issues. >> and jean cummings, you've covered economics in the business world for so m
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